Opportunities

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Current Opportunities

The solicitation is a coordinated effort of the University of Wisconsin System, and the Wisconsin departments of Natural Resources; Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection; and Safety and Professional Services. This cooperative solicitation allows interested individuals to prepare project proposals that can be submitted to several different funding sources simultaneously and eliminates the need to submit similar proposals several times for different solicitation efforts. It is our intent that this joint solicitation will make it easier for interested researchers to prepare proposals, promote coordination among state organizations and researchers, and enhance the ability of state agencies and the UW System to meet their objectives.

Learn more.

Past Opportunities

Attention researchers:

The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the National Institutes for Water Resources has released their annual request for proposals under its National Competitive Grants Program (104G, PFAS, and Aquatic Invasive Species). Any investigator at an institution of higher learning is eligible to apply for these grants with research that focuses on water issues of regional and national importance.

The Great Lakes Region Water Resources Institutes (IL, IN, MI, MN, OH. and WI) hosted a joint webinar on March 18th, 2022 at 11 a.m. CDT that focused on these RFPs. We will discussed the full proposal process, funding priorities, and provided researchers an opportunity to ask questions and potentially make connections with others across the region. For more information about the funding opportunities for Wisconsin researchers, contact the University of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute at maboyce@aqua.wisc.edu.

Webinar recording
Webinar presentation slides
NIWR Great Lakes contacts

Proposals are sought on the topic of improving and enhancing the nation’s water supply and availability, and promoting the exploration of new ideas that address or expand our understanding of water problems, including the following specific areas of inquiry (levels of priority are not assigned, and the order of listing does not indicate the level of priority):

  • Abundance, location, and persistence of legacy nutrients: What are the mechanisms that facilitate accumulation and persistence? Where in landscape are they stored and what does that mean for the potential to enter or move through the hydrologic system? What are the methods, time periods, and utility to characterizing “new” versus “old” sources? Do related nutrients persist and move in the same way, and what does this mean for short- and long-term water quality?
  • Trends of integrated processes: How do changes in one aspect of water quantity and availability affect other long-term aspects? For example, how are changes in groundwater identifiable as changes in streamflow patterns? How do changes in streamflow result in changes in water quality?
  • Water Conflict: What are the risks of water conflict as a result of inter-basin transfers driven by water-use behavior, socioeconomic conditions, changing land-use patterns, and climate variability. Aspects for consideration include identification of thresholds, tradeoffs between sectors and(or) communities, conservation opportunities and stakeholder actions, agent-based modeling, relevant laws and regulations, and adaptive management.

The challenges and opportunities of understanding the impact of per-and polyfluoroalkyl (PFAS) substances on water resources are poorly understood, despite the real and growing effect of this group of man-made substances on water quality. Research is needed to better understand these interactions and guide management decisions that will improve water resources at the regional scale or national scale. Proposals are sought on the following specific areas of inquiry (levels of priority are not assigned, and the order of listing does not indicate the level of priority):

  • Novel proxies for PFAS detection and quantification
  • Process-oriented research of PFAS fate, transport, and effects, with emphasis on molecular-level understanding of PFAS precursor transformation, sorption dynamics, or mechanisms of bioaccumulation and(or) biological/ecological effects.
  • Atmospheric transport of PFAS that results in delivery to the hydrologic system via precipitation and runoff at regional or national scales.

The challenges and opportunities that link aquatic invasive species and water resources are poorly understood, despite the real and growing effect of numerous aquatic invasive species on water quality, water quantity, and aquatic ecosystems. Research is needed to better identify and understand these interactions and to guide management decisions that will help to improve invasive species management and thus reduce effects of invasive species on water resources and aquatic ecosystems at local, regional, and national scales. Proposals are sought on the following specific areas of inquiry (levels of priority are not assigned, and the order of listing does not indicate the level of priority):

  • Effects: Improve our understanding of the effects of aquatic invasive species on lakes, rivers, and associated tributaries in the upper Mississippi River basin, including changes to water quantity, water quality, and ecosystem dynamics.
  • Characteristics: Identify physical, biological, and chemical characteristics of water bodies that infer resistance and resilience to the distribution, establishment, and effects of aquatic invasive species in the upper Mississippi River basin. Research is needed to better understand these interactions to guide management decisions that will improve invasive species management and result in positive effects on aquatic ecosystems.
  • Management: Assessment of the detection, spread, and management of aquatic invasive species in the upper Mississippi River basin and the connections to human dimensions, both socially and economically.

Any investigator at an institution of higher learning in the United States is eligible to apply for a grant through a Water Resources Research Institute established under the provisions of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as amended (http://water.usgs.gov/wrri/index.php). Proposals involving substantial collaboration between the USGS and university scientists are encouraged. Proposals may be for projects of 1 to 3 years in duration and may request up to $250,000 in federal funds with an anticipated start date of 12/1/22. Successful applicants must match each dollar of the federal grant with one dollar from non-federal sources. The Government’s obligation under this program is contingent upon the availability of funds.

Wisconsin applicants:

Please contact Melissa Boyce (maboyce@aqua.wisc.edu) at the Wisconsin Water Resources Institute as soon as possible for submission instructions. The due date for PIs to submit applications to the Wisconsin Water Resources Institute is 5 p.m. CDT on April 26, 2022.

For more detail, program announcements are attached and links are below:

Water Resources 104g general: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=338699

PFAS: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=338700

AIS: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=338681

File Downloads:

FY22 104G Full Proposal eDrop Guidelines
FY22 104G PFAS Full Proposal eDrop Guidelines
Budget file (Excel)
Sample budget justification narrative